Cypress [ Current Inventory ]
Formal Name: Taxodium distichium

Other Names: Bald cypress, red cypress, Southern cypress, Louisiana red cypress, Gulf cypress, black cypress, buck cypress

Wood Description

Cypress sapwood varies in color from degrees of pale yellow to light brown, gradually darkening into the heartwood, which can range from reddish brown to nearly black. Heartwood from trees in southern swamplands is darker in color than cypress grown further north in drier climates. The wood is coarse with a straight grain and a naturally oily or greasy feel. The oils in the heartwood, called cypressene, make it one of the most durable woods, with strong resistance to decay when exposed to moisture.

Region

Cypress is found throughout North and Central America, including Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala in wet, swampy areas. In the U.S. it grows along the East Coast from New Jersey south to Florida and throughout the mid-south in areas such as Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas.

Working Properties

The machinability of cypress is good, but can, on occasion, present a fuzzy surface when cut. Pre-boring at board edges will help prevent splitting. It nails and screws very well. It glues well and sands relatively easily. The straight grain yields good finishing results with stains and varnishes. It also takes paint very well. If not dried properly, cypress may warp with slight movement in performance.

Main Uses

The machinability of cypress is good, but can, on occasion, present a fuzzy surface when cut. Pre-boring at board edges will help prevent splitting. It nails and screws very well. It glues well and sands relatively easily. The straight grain yields good finishing results with stains and varnishes. It also takes paint very well. If not dried properly, cypress may warp with slight movement in performance.

Current Inventory
800-248-4393